Common Walnut

“A Low-Maintenance and Frost-Hardy Tree”

The walnut is a deciduous tree with bark that changes from green-brown when young to pale and fissured when mature. It was introduced by the ancient Romans, who believed the edible nuts were the food of their god Jupiter. Walnut wood is prized for woodworking and gun stocks. The wood at the base of the tree is especially valued for its beautiful swirling grain patterns. The leaves and mature fruit yield a dark brown dye.

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Coast Redwood

“An Iconic California Tree”

An iconic tree of coastal California, redwoods are native to a thin coastal band from Oregon south through the Big Sur region of California, but are planted widely beyond that range also. Coast redwoods are the tallest trees in North America. The lumber is highly valued for its beauty, is light weight and resistant to decay. Its lack of resin makes it resistant to fire, so it is used extensively as building material. During the great fire in San Francisco in 1906, the use of redwood lumber in framing rendered some buildings fire resistant. In the past, railroad ties and trestles were made of redwood. While there remain pockets of old-growth trees, ancient coast redwoods are rarely found near urban areas.

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Texas Post Oak

“The Most Common Texas Oak”

The post oak (Quercus stellata) is one of the most common oaks in Texas, and occurs from Texas and Oklahoma east throughout the southeast and mid-Atlantic states. The latin ‘stellata’ means ‘star’ and refers to the star-shaped trichomes, or leaf hairs, on the bottom surface of its leaves. Decay-resistant, the wood is often used for fence posts (hence the name), as well as for construction timbers and railroad ties. Post oak is in the white oak group, and readily cross-breeds with other white oaks, resulting in numerous hybrids.

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Aleppo Pine

“An Ideal Ornamental for Hot Climates”

Aleppo pine is native to the Mediterranean region, and is often grown there for timber and other wood products. In North America, it is widely planted in parks and landscapes as an ornamental in similar hot climates with seasonal rain such as Arizona and Southern California. In Greece, the resin from Aleppo pine has been used for more than 2,000 years to seal and flavor wine known as retsina. The Aleppo pine has slender, light green needles in fascicles of two or, very rarely, three.

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Japanese Evergreen Oak

“A Hardy, Slow-Growing Evergreen”

Japanese evergreen oak is native to Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and parts of China. It was introduced in the United States in 1878. This species, Quercus acuta, is often confused in commerce with other evergreen oak species such as Quercus glauca and Quercus myrsinifolia. The wood of the Japanese evergreen oak is used for Japanese martial arts practice weapons.

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Posted in Tree Species

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